A fine morning on Pontchartrain

Saltwater fisherman share stories, tips, etc.

A fine morning on Pontchartrain

Postby dleo » Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:49 am

“A fine morning on Pontchartrain”

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For the past several years I have had the privilege of fishing with Captain Mike Gallo of Angling Adventures out of Slidell, Louisiana. Captain Mike is a long time friend of my family and every year I will take him white tail deer hunting in Mississippi and he will take me fishing. Over the past several years we have been red fishing in the Louisiana marsh but on this day he wanted to change it up. On this trip I would be fishing with my regular fishing partner and cousin Joseph Fails and his girlfriend Maressa. She had never been before and was highly intrigued. Well Captain Mike convinced us we needed to fish for spotted sea trout more commonly called specks. We would be fishing Lake Pontchartrain which is a brackish estuary this means it receives both fresh water and salt water meaning the salinity in the water varies by location. Captain Mike has a beautiful lodge on the water in Slidell and this is where we spent the night. The next morning we got up early and were in his boat by 5am. He makes it really convenient with a boat slip at his lodge. As we made our way across Pontchartrain I could not help but marvel at God’s graces and the many blessings we receive every time we partake in them. It was only a short trip to the bridges we would be fishing so the sun was not even breaking yet when we arrived. Captain Mike gave us a brief run down on how to fish the rigs we were using as we would be fishing with spinning reels and live shrimp. He told us how to move the bait and what the bite would feel like. It was not long before we had the bait in the water and the excitement began. I missed the first few fish as the bite was soft and I did not know what to expect. Once I knew what to look for I was bringing them in left and right. There were several times we would all have a fish on at the same time and the fight was on. I am sure there are not many times you can go and catch the shear number of fish we did so I knew I was blessed as this was happening. The limit on specks is 25 per person and we had our limit of keepers by 915 that morning. We probably boated upwards of 175 fish of various size and species as there are many species of fish in Pontchartrain. As we arrived back at the dock a little before 10 I was in awe of what we had just accomplished as we all caught fish and had a wonderful time enjoying are many blessings. As we were making the short trip back to Mississippi I could not help but think of my friend Mike Brooks. I was thinking how much he would enjoy the Cajun fried speckle trout, turnip greens and hush puppies. One day I will be able to show him a find southern cuisine but until that time I will enjoy it for the both of us.

Doug Leo
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Postby Mike Brooks » Wed Jun 03, 2009 9:01 am

What a trip, maybe we should get a bunch of guys together and come down, what fun would that be??
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Postby dleo » Wed Jun 03, 2009 9:06 am

his lodge will sleep 10 and he has another captain that could help take everyone out.
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Postby Bob Brooks » Sat Jul 18, 2009 8:04 am

It sure sounded like a fun day. How would you cook those fish? And which way would you clean them, Scale, Skin. Fillet ?
Mike Brooks is actually my little brother, but he is much bigger than me...

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Postby dleo » Mon Jul 20, 2009 6:36 am

it is really simple to clean a speckled trout. all you do is start with a good sharp filet knife. they are easiest to clean if you leave them on ice for a while as to freeze the fish and make stiff this makes the process easier. Next you turn the fish up with it belly in the air and you start at the anus and cut the stomach out. that is the easiest way to gut them. next all you do is filet them like any other fish. As for cooking them they are really good fried but i like to blacken them cajun style on the stove.
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